Pumpkin Ravioli with Burnt Butter and Crispy Sage

Happy Monday everyone!

Today’s post is brought to you by the letter B. Jokes, it’s actually brought to you by Boyfriend.

Ravioli with burnt butter and crispy sage is something we’ve eaten out a number of times and so we decided to try our hand at making our own.  Boyfriend has kindly written up the process.  And so once again, I’ll step aside (I’m starting to feel lazy) and let Boyfriend fill you in.

A week or two ago we trying to decide on a quick easy meal for dinner. We were umming and ahhing between noodles, sushi, pizza… the usual. Not feeling like any of it we thought we’d have a go at making a ravioli with a burnt butter sauce, just for something a bit different.

We’ve made ravioli from scratch before, and would highly recommend you try it if you haven’t. It’s very rewarding and WAY better than anything you can buy in the supermarket. That being said, on this particular occasion we decided to get the fresh pumpkin ravioli (actually it was raviolini) from Fourth Village Providore in Mosman and it came pretty close to what you can make at home (it’s made on the premises daily).

To make our dish we used is the following :

Pumpkin raviolini
Field and button mushrooms
Baby spinach
Garlic,
A lot of butter
Walnuts
Sage which was crisped up in the frypan
and a mature (hard) goats cheese which was grated over the top.

First of all we got our huge pan of water on to cook the raviolini. We bought 500 grams and thought it would be way too much for the two of us, but because the sauce was simple it turned out it was the perfect amount. We put the raviolini in to cook once the water boiled, then started on the rest of the sauce.

We started by pouring some oil in a hot frypan and crisping up a dozen or so sage leaves then taking them out and draining them on some paper towel.

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Once they were removed we added a bit more oil and a small amount of butter and waited for it to foam.

We put the sliced mushrooms into the pan and allowed them to cook for a minute or two before adding the garlic. (Make sure you don’t burn the garlic, otherwise it ends up tasting quite acrid). When the mushrooms were nice and browned we removed them from the pan and set them aside to add back in later.

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We added in a good knob (about a tablespoon and a half) of butter to the pan and let it first foam, then turn into a nice medium/dark brown to release a nice nutty flavour. If your butter goes black or starts to smoke/smell like burning then it’s too cooked.

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Once the butter was where we wanted it we removed the ravioli in batches from the boiling water and straight into the pan. Be careful as water going into hot fat tends to spit. We don’t want anybody to lose an eye.

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Once all the raviolini was back in the pan and nicely browned/coated in the butter we added the mushrooms, two big handfuls of baby spinach (though you can use as much as you want), a handful or two of chopped walnuts and a good grating of the hard goats cheese.

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To finish we served it into bowls with the sauce spooned over the pasta, some extra walnuts over the top, another sprinkling of the goats cheese, the crispy sage on top and plenty of cracked black pepper. If you like you can give a little drizzle of olive oil over the top – it just depends on how much sauce is in the bowl.

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Would we make it again? Definitely!